Sub-Unit Activities, Inquiries, Inquiry Questions, and Data Analyses
  • States of Matter
    • Concepts:
      • Students learn about the different states of matter; solids, liquids and gasses.
      • Students will visually see examples of the three states of matter, and be able to research and explore them deeper.
      • Students will learn about the transformation between the three stages.
      • Students will learn how something can take the form two of the three or even all three.
    • Activities:
      • Students will be making “oobleck” which will teach them about liquids and solids, and will give them hands on experience. Students will also be playing the vapors from a humidifier, which will teach them about gases, and it will also create a hands on learning experience for them. (Concepts 1 and 2)
      • Students can see from the “oobleck” how it can change from a liquid to a solid and vice versa. They will also be able to see how water in the humidifier turns in vapors (gas). (Concept 3)
      • By playing the “oobleck” students will be able to see that “oobleck” can be both a solid and a liquid. The humidifier will teach them that water can be a liquid and a gas, and they can be reminded that ice is a solid form of water as well. This will show them how things can take on multiple forms. (Concept 4)
      • The students can also write down where they see the appearance of solids, liquids, and gases in their lives and communities. After, they can discuss what they see with a small group and compare, contrast and possibly debate what they have written. (All of the concepts.) This would be done after the “oobleck” activity.
    • Questions:
      • What do you know about transformation?
      • What do you know about solids, liquids and gases?
      • What do you notice about the “oobleck?
      • What makes something a certain matter?
      • Where else do you see transformation besides matter? How does that relate to matter?
      • Why do you think transformation is important? Why is the transformation of matter important?
  • Water Cycle
    • Concepts:
      • Students will learn where water comes from
      • Students will learn how water is used
      • Students will learn the purpose and importance of the water cycle.
      • Students will learn what clouds are and what they are made of.
      • Students will learn how rain forms and why it rains.
    • Activities:
      • Class discussion about where water comes from (Concept 1)
      • Take a in school “field trip” to find where water comes from in a manufactured sense. (Concept 1)
      • Set up a water station in the class, and let students play and discover different ways to use water. (Concept 2)
      • Have students talk/write about how water is used on a global scale (Concept 2)
      • Have students research how much water is used daily, monthly and yearly. (Concept 2)
      • Students can draw what they think the water cycle looks like (Concept 3)
      • Students will get in groups and research what the water cycle is, how it functions and why it is important (Concept 3)
      • Students will build a small-scale water cycle (Concept 3)
      • Students will do a sustainability project where they can develop ways to save water in their home. (Concept 3)
      • Students can do condensation activities; make clouds in a bottle. (Concept 4)
      • Students can see how the temperature changes when a bottle is opened and closed. (Concept 4)
      • Set up a precipitation activity with a bowl of ice and pan of boiling water and have the students watch the drops of water. (Concept 5)
      • Students can make a model of precipitation in groups, and display it for the class. (Concept 5)
      • The activities that align with four and five should be done after one. After that order the rest does not matter.
    • Questions
      • What is rain, and why does it rain?
      • How do clouds form?
      • What are clouds? How do clouds form?
      • What three things are needed to make clouds?
      • How are raindrops formed?
      • Why do we need the water cycle?
      • How do we use water?
      • Where does water come from?
  • Basic Atoms
    • Concepts:
      • Students will learn the structure of an atom.
      • Students will learn the atomic structure of water.
      • Students will learn the different functions of an atom.
    • Activities:
      • Students can draw a picture of what they think an atom looks like. (Concept 1)
      • After learning about atoms, students can build a model of one. (Concept 1)
      • Students can build 3 atoms and connect them together to make a water molecule. (Concept 2)
      • Students can act out how atoms form together to make water molecules (Concept 2)
      • Students can get in groups and research about atoms and their function and different forms (Concept 3)
      • Students can write a story, paper, anything about the transformation atoms take. (Concept 3)
      • Students will make a picture book about atoms, and the different forms it can take (Concept 3)
      • These activities should be done in the order as listed above. To ensure no confusion for the students and so they know the structure of atom before learning its functions.
    • Questions:
      • What is an atom?
      • What does an atom look like?
      • How do atoms connect together?
      • What is water made of?
      • How big are atoms?
      • How do atoms transform?
  • Natural Earth Materials vs. Manufactured Materials
    • Concepts:
      • Students will learn about the importance of the natural materials we have on earth.
      • Students will see the benefits and consequences of manufactured materials.
    • Activities:
      • Students can make a list of the natural materials that they know of. (Concept 1)
      • Students will research how those materials are important. (Concept 1)
      • Students can work alone or in groups, and together present one natural material and its importance. (Concept 1)
      • Together as class natural earth materials can be collected and experimented with. (Concept 1)
      • Students can take their list of natural materials and fine one manufactured material that hinders it. (Concept 2)
      • Students can do the same thing as above but find a manufactured material that helps it. (Concept 2)
      • Students can experiment (or research if experiment is not possible) on how these materials hinder and help natural materials. (Concept 2)
      • Students can look at plastic, Styrofoam and like materials to observe how they hinder the earth and natural materials. (Concept 2)
    • Questions:
      • Why are earth materials important?
      • What do earth materials do?
      • Are earth materials hindered by anything?
      • How do you think plastic and Styrofoam contribute to the earth?
      • Are manufactured materials important? Why or why not?
      • How do manufactured materials help? How do they hurt?
  • Techniques for Analyzing Data:
    • Looking at the questions we asked before and seeing if they were answered.
    • Asking more questions for more research if necessary.
    • Students can look for similarities between the different stages of matter
    • Students can look at how transformation is similar no matter what form it takes.
    • Students can look at the transformation in every sub –unit and discuss how they are related, and how they are different.

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